F.A.Q. Ελληνικά English

How much does orthodontic treatment cost?

The fee for an individual’s treatment is determined by a variety of factors, including the severity of the problem to be corrected, as well as the anticipated length of treatment.  Fees may be different from orthodontist to orthodontist and from one region to another.  The type of “appliance” (the formal name for braces, aligners, retainers, etc.) may also be a consideration.

According to the American Dental Association survey of dental fees for 2013 (its most recent study), the fee for comprehensive treatment of adolescents ranged from $4,685 to $6,500, and the fee for comprehensive treatment of adults ranged from $4,800 to $7,135.

Most orthodontists offer a variety of payment plans to make orthodontic care affordable. The plans offered likely vary from doctor to doctor.  Each doctor sets his/her own policies on payment plans.

Payment plans may or may not require a down payment.  Many orthodontists provide in-office financing for as long as 24 months with no interest charged.  To help patients spread their payments over a longer period of time, some orthodontists may be able to connect patients with a third-party finance company.  The advantage is that monthly payments over a longer period of time can be smaller than payments over 24 months.  Be aware, however, that a third-party finance company will charge interest.

Some patients have dental insurance that includes orthodontic benefits that will cover a portion of the fee for treatment.  Funds from flexible spending accounts (FSAs) can be used toward orthodontic treatment.

Talk to your orthodontist about how to maximize your benefits.


Will the orthodontist take my insurance?  How much does insurance cover?

If you have dental insurance that includes orthodontic benefits, check with the insurance company or your employer’s HR department to learn details of the coverage available to you – whether coverage is for a percentage of the fee or is capped at a specific dollar amount (“lifetime cap”); who your policy covers (you, or you and your spouse, or you and your spouse and your children, etc., and whether insurance coverage has an age limit); and whether you are required to choose from the insurance company’s providers.

Do be sure that the provider you select for orthodontic treatment is a member of the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO).  AAO membership is your assurance that the doctor is an orthodontist because the AAO accepts only orthodontists as members. To be an orthodontist means the individual must first graduate from dental school, and then successfully complete an additional 2-3 years of studying orthodontics at an accredited orthodontic residency program. Only those who have this level of formal education may call themselves “orthodontists.” And only orthodontists are eligible for admission into the American Association of Orthodontists.<br>

Which treatment is the fastest?

Thanks to advances in technology, just about every type of treatment is relatively fast.

    These important steps will make your treatment go as quickly as possible:
  1. Follow your orthodontist’s instructions on brushing, flossing, professional cleanings, and diet.
  2. Keep your scheduled appointments with your orthodontist.
  3. Make sure your orthodontist is a member of the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO).  AAO members have the training, experience and treatment options to make sure you get your best smile.

Which treatment is the best?

The best treatment is the kind performed by an orthodontist.  Orthodontists have the training, experience and treatment options to make sure you get your best smile.

Choose a member of the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) for orthodontic treatment to be assured that the doctor is an orthodontist – someone who first graduated from dental school and then went on for 2-3 more years of studying orthodontics at an accredited orthodontic residency program.  Only these people can call themselves “orthodontists,” and only they can be admitted as members of the AAO.  


What’s the ideal age for orthodontic treatment – is there one?

Chronological age is not a factor when deciding whether a patient is a candidate for orthodontic treatment; there is not one ideal age for treatment to begin. Healthy teeth can be moved at any age. Regardless of age, patients can look forward to teeth that not only look better, but work better, too.

The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) recommends that all children get a check-up with an orthodontist at the first recognition of the existence of an orthodontic problem, but no later than age 7. Few patients will need to begin treatment that young, but there are some who will benefit from early intervention. For these patients, treatment is likely to consist of guiding the growth of the jaws so that the permanent teeth are in good positions as they come in. 

​ ​
A check-up while some baby teeth are still present, and while the face and jaws are growing, may reveal that immediate treatment is not necessary, but that the child could benefit from treatment in the future. In these cases, the patient visits the orthodontist periodically to monitor growth and development. This “watchful waiting” gives the orthodontist the opportunity to advise parents when the best time is for that child to begin treatment
​ ​
Often the orthodontist is able to take advantage of predictable periods of a patient’s growth and intervene so that orthodontic treatment can have the best results possible. There are some things that cannot be accomplished once the face and jaws are no longer growing.

Still, orthodontic treatment can be highly successful in adults. The physiological process of moving teeth is the same in adults as it is in children. Adult orthodontic treatment may take a little longer than children’s treatment due to denser bone tissue in adults. A new smile can be especially profound for adults who have spent years hiding their teeth.

Overall, the time required for orthodontic treatment is shorter than it was in the past. Members of the American Association of Orthodontists report that the average length of orthodontic treatment is 22 months.

Do be sure to seek out an orthodontist for orthodontic treatment. Orthodontists are dentistry’s specialists in moving teeth and aligning jaws to achieve a healthy bite. Orthodontists get to be specialists by graduating from dental school, and then successfully completing an additional 2-3 years of education in orthodontics at an accredited orthodontic residency program. Only people who have attained this level of formal education may call themselves “orthodontists,” and only orthodontists are accepted for membership in the AAO. By choosing an AAO member, the public is assured that the doctor truly is an orthodontist.

Orthodontists have the training, experience and treatment options to make sure you get your best smile.


I have seen three orthodontists.  They each offer a different treatment plan.  Which one is right?

There is not a single “right way” to perform orthodontic treatment. As long as all of the doctors you have consulted are orthodontists, all are correct.

Membership in the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) is your assurance that the doctor is an orthodontist because the AAO accepts only orthodontists as members. To be an orthodontist means the individual must first graduate from dental school, and then successfully complete an additional 2-3 years of studying orthodontics at an accredited orthodontic residency program. Only those who have this level of formal education may call themselves “orthodontists.” And only orthodontists are eligible for admission into the American Association of Orthodontists.

How long does treatment last?

The average length of orthodontic treatment is 22 months, according to a 2014 survey among members of the American Association of Orthodontists.


For information on this subject please contact Dr Eva A. Douvara DMD PhD, owner and principle of the Dental Clinic Dr Douvaras. 
Tel: +30 210 7224224 - Mob: +30 6932 48 66 48